7 Lessons I Learned Because I Lost My Cell Phone — Again!

lost your cellJoin the Conversation. Have you ever lost your cell? What did you do? How long did you go without it? Talk to us now.

I lost my cell phone a few days ago.

Thankfully, this is the first time in sevel months that my iPhone has gone missing for so long.

But more than a year ago, while my poor mother was being ravaged by cancer and I was helplessly watching her dying — a very painful time — I lost my iPhone repeatedly. Every few days, I couldn’t find it. A few days after she passed away, I even lost it twice in one day. I was that upset.

(In fact, after losing my iPhone the last time, I finally bought a new one, but then the old one surfaced while I was moving. Alas, I still can’t access photos of my Mom in her final days, because in my giref, I spaced out and punched in the wrong passcode too many times.)

Back to my cell phone that went M.I.A.. this week.

Photos 4-2-14 004This week, apparently my joy, excitement, and desire to serve others distracted me.

Somehow, my cell phone went missing while I was getting more and more thrilled that so many big names have agreed to participate in the Sugar World Summit.

I am so excited!

This virtual Sugar World Summit — which I’ve scheduled to begin exactly two weeks before Halloween — or what I call Sugar Overload Day — will present world-renowned experts on sugar, carbs, stress, emotional eating, mindfulness training, addiction science, cravings, weight loss and more.

Such movers and shakers as Dr. Robert Lustig, Dr. Mark Hyman, and JJ Virgin all have agreed to join us.

In this Sugar World Summit, our gurus won’t just tell you The Sour Scoop. They’ll give you some Sweet Solutions, too, as I announced here.

Back to my missing iPhone. I haven’t bought a new cell phone yet, because I keep thinking it’ll turn up, but searching my car, desk, bedroom, kitchen and living room hasn’t helped.

I’m also waiting to talk to a friend of mine, who has an uncanny knack for helping me find missing things. (She’s off dealing with some personal issues.)

Anyhow, It’s been very strange to be phone-less.

  • No calling friends or family members while on a walk.
  • No calling friends while parked in my car.
  • No calling business colleagues if I get a hot idea.
  • No digging up phone numbers of important people.
  • No tweeting cool stuff, something I started doing recently.

The case of my MIA Cell Phone is intriguing me. In fact, NOT having my iPhone has taught me five main things.

  1. I multitask far, far too much — like most of you? There’s no need to be on my cell phone while going for a wonderful walk along the ocean, when I can focus fully on waves crashing against the shore.
  2. I’m entirely too reliant on my cell phone. This is not a necessary appendage!
  3. I’m also entirely too dependent on my iPhone camera, on which I’ve taken the some beautiful sunset photos. (See one here that I previously downloaded to my computer.) But why don’t I buy a real camera instead, as I’ve been planning?
  4. I need to totally unplug more often. Although I turn off my cell several times a day, that time without it is very cleansing. Darn am I being productive!
  5. I need to get more in touch with nature and less attached to my cell.
  6. By disconnecting from electronics, I’m reconnecting to my purpose, passions, and peace of mind. This is perhaps my biggest lesson. I’m really enjoying the calm of not being so attached to my cell phone. It’s a welcome relief during this time of book deadlines and Sugar World Summit planning.
  7. While I’ve been without a cell phone, I’ve become quite creative in the kitchen. Instead of chatting on the phone with friends, I’ve been concocting a variety of culinary dishes (all sugar-free, of course) that taste pretty good, if I may say so myself. (More later about that.)

So now I have an idea. I was thinking about giving in and buying another iPhone, but today it hit me that I’m going to give myself a Cell Phone Challenge.

You see, I’m on tight deadline now for my next book — I’ll tell you more shortly — and I decided not to let myself buy another iPhone phone until I’m finished writing the book. Now that may be another three weeks or more, but how’s that for incentive to finish the book?!

If I finish the book, I get a cell phone!

If not, I have to go without my iPhone. Dislosure: I do, however, have a helpful land line.

Join the Conversation. Have you ever lost your cell? What did you do? How long did you go without it? Talk to us now.

Special thanks to the TeleComBlog.com and to Matt Klassen. Forgive me if I shouldn’t have used this art from your story. I’ll take it down if you ask.

A Look at Sugar Consumption over the Years

Special thanks to Online Nursing Programs for this special graphic, “Nursing Your Sweet Tooth,” which illustrates our massive increase in sugar consumption over the years.

By the way, the figure for today’s total is too low — the average American consumes more like 150 or even 170 pounds of sugar per year, according to my research — but this chart still gives you an idea of the massive upswing on sugar consumption from the early 1800s.

sugar consumption
Created by: www.OnlineNursingPrograms.com

Is Sugar Toxic? “60 Minutes” Explores Issue: Hurrah!

Robert LustigTonight,  on “60 Minutes,” multiple Emmy-award winning chief medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta will tell the show’s viewers about new studies, which suggest that sugar is toxic.

Specifically, on “60 Minutes,” Dr. Gupta will tell viewers:

“New research coming out of some of America’s most respected institutions is starting to find that sugar could be a driving force behind some of this country’s leading killers.”

Of course, this sugar-is-toxic conclusion — which has been gaining momentum for years — is nothing new to those of you, who are regular visitors to this Sugar Shock Blog and to readers of my first book, Sugar Shock, which was first published in 2007.

Sanjay GuptaFor my part, I’m thrilled that “60 Minutes” is devoting time to explore the question of whether or not sugar is toxic. I’ve been hoping for such a segment for years.

What I find especially exciting is that Dr. Gupta will spotlight the close cancer-sugar connection, which I also explored in my book, Sugar Shock.

I also examine recent sugar-can-cause-cancer research in my upcoming book, Beyond Sugar Shock, which is being published in June by Hay House. (In the book, I guide readers to eaily break free of their sugar addiction by joining me in a fun, six-week Mind-Body-Spirit adventure.)

Anyhow, in the “60 Minutes” segment about sugar, you’ll watch Dr. Gupta interview respected pediatric endocrinologist Dr. Robert H. Lustig, whose YouTube video, Sugar: The Bitter Truth, has gone viral, attracting 2,159,456 viewers (as of today).

Dr. Lustig, a pediatric endocrinologist at the University of California, is not alone in his sugar-is-toxic view.

Amazon Sug Sh 51RDZ7DBVAL._SL110_Indeed, many cutting-edge physicians, including Dr. Stephen T. Sinatra, medical consultant for my book Sugar Shock, contend that the high amount of sugar in the American diet is killing us. (By the way, I disagree with the low figures usually cited — most Americans consume far more than the 130 or 150 pounds a year that’s often mentioned in news reports.)

While I applaud “60 Minutes” for telling the nation that sugar can be toxic, I also need to congratulate Dr. Mehmet Oz for his important work drawing attention to sugar’s dangers in several episodes of the top-rated “The Doctor Oz Show.”

In one episode, Dr. Mehmet Oz even called sugar “The # 1 food Dr. Oz Wants Out of Your House.” Hurrah!

By the way, I’m honored that Dr. Oz praised my book, Sugar Shock.

Again, congratulations to “60 Minutes” for devoting a segment to this important sugar subject.

 Join us on my Facebook fan page during and after “60 Minutes” airs to share your thoughts and feelings about the is-sugar-toxic segment.

Make sure to tell your friends and family members to watch this important “60 Minutes” episode.

Watch the full episode below.

If you have a sugar addiction and are worried about the toxic effects, stay tuned for free teleseminars that will help you to break free of your dangerous behavior.

I also invite you to keep a lookout for my next book, Beyond Sugar Shock, which gives you a simple, compassionate six-week Mind-Body-Spirit Plan to let your addiction float away into nothingness.

Food Addiction Program Featuring Dr. Robert Lustig, Michael Prager, Etc. Planned

Robert H. Lustig, M.D., whose YouTube video, Sugar: The Bitter Truth, hit viral, and Michael Prager, author of the exciting book, Fat Boy, Thin Man, are among the fascinating experts I’ll have the pleasure of meeting and listening to in an exciting program about food addiction at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco next week.

Stay tuned for some compelling points that you’ll get from these amazing speakers.

These are the experts lined up.

Michael Prager, Author, Fat Boy Thin Man
Nicole Avena, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of Florida
Eric Stice, Ph.D., Senior Research Scientist, Oregon Research Institute
Dr. Vera Ingrid Tarman, MD., MSc., FCEP, CASAM, Medical Director, Renascent
Elissa Epel, Ph.D., Associate Professor, UCSF Department of Psychiatry
Robert H. Lustig, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, in the Division of Endocrinology at UCSF

Now read the enticing description:

Addiction is about brains, not just about behaviors. We all have the brain reward circuitry that makes food rewarding; it’s a survival mechanism. In a healthy brain, these rewards have feedback mechanisms for satiety or “‘enough.” For some, the circuitry becomes dysfunctional such that the message becomes “more.” Michael Prager, author of Fat Boy Thin Man, will begin the discussion telling his very personal story of recognizing and then seeking treatment for his food addiction. Leading researchers and clinicians will discuss many aspects of this important topic.

Is Sugar as Toxic as Alcohol? Researchers Say Yes

Sugar-addiction

In recent years, scientists have theorized that sugar can be as addictive as alcohol or tobacco. 

You, of course, know how easy it is to get hooked on sweets — and how incredibly challenging and difficult it can be to break free of your sugar addiction.

(In fact, because breaking free from sugar is so tough, I've devoted an entire book to take you on a fun, empowering journey so you can easily let go of your addiction. Beyond Sugar Shock — which will be published in June and which you can pre-order now — is designed to hold you by the hand and guide you to what I call Sugar Freedom.)

So since sugar is addictive, should this commonplace but potentially harmful (even deadly) substance be regulated?

Acclaimed researcher Robert Lustig, M.D. and a team of UCSF researchers say yes.

They argue that sugar should be controlled like alcohol and tobacco to protect public health.

Indeed, Dr. Lustig, along with Laura Schmidt, Ph.D., Claire Brindis, D.P.H. and colleagues at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), contend that sugar’s potential for abuse, coupled with its toxicity and pervasiveness in the Western diet, make it a primary culprit of this worldwide health crisis.

They maintain that sugar is fueling a global obesity pandemic, contributing to 35 million deaths annually worldwide from non-communicable diseases like diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

The authors then advocate taxing sugary foods and controlling sales to children under 17.

According to their statistics, reported on CBS New’s HealthPop, worldwide sugar intake has tripled in the last 50 years, and the average person is taking in a whopping 500 calories from added sugar in processed foods alone.

So what do you think? Should sugar be regulated?

A special thank you: Photo credit is due here (flickr) and here (DailyBurn).

Post your ideas here on this Sugar Shock Blog and/or on my Facebook Smart Habits Fans page.

 

Moody? Tired? Unfocused? You Could Have Hypoglycemia

Are you headachy, tired or crabby?

Do you cry easily, have blurred vision or get heart palpitations?

Roberta If so, Roberta Ruggiero can help you.

Roberta is founder and president of the Hypoglycemia Support Foundation, which celebrated its 30th anniversary yesterday.

The Hypoglycemia Support Foundation (HSF) is
an amazing organization, whose mission is to give information, hope and
inspiration to those who suffer from the devastating effects of low
blood sugar.

Frankly, I don’t know where I’d be today if it weren’t for Roberta. Back
in 1998 after my doctor ordered me to quit sweets because of my
hypoglycemia, Roberta was my kind, patient hero and savior. Seriously. For months, Roberta patiently answered my many questions, was constantly encouraging and gave me hope.

If
you are eating lots of sweets and simple carbs, chances are good that
you, too, have been hit by horrible blood sugar highs and lows –
hypoglycemia.

If you suspect that you have low blood sugar, take the great hypoglycemia quiz on the HSF website.

Go here to take the hypo test: ====== >>>>>> http://www.hypoglycemia.org/hypo_test.asp

Stay tuned, because the HSF will be adding many exciting new features to its website. So I encourage you to get on the mailing list now so you don’t miss any news from the Hypoglycemia Support Foundation.

I also encourage you to make a donation to this worthwhile organization.

Then, learn about Roberta’s amazing story and listen to me interview her.

Listen now (just look for the last few links on the page:
====== >>>>>>
http://www.fasttrackkicksugar.com/replay/

Overlooked Health Epidemic: Experts Educate You on my Radio Show About Lyme Disease & Read My Op Ed on AOL News

Are you aware about the terrifying, tick-transmitted epidemic that’s growing at a rate faster than AIDS?

Lyme-disease Did you know that prominent victims include Parker Posey, Richard Gere, President George W. Bush, Alice Walker and Christie Brinkley?

In fact, this is a health problem that often befuddles physicians.

Sadly, “ill-informed doctors are often flummoxed when patients complain of
fatigue, headaches, fever or chills, muscle or joint pain, mental
confusion, swollen lymph nodes and neurological symptoms. It’s an
appalling display of indifference.” So I pointed out in my recent op ed piece on AOL News.

Have you guessed yet? I’m talking about Lyme disease.

Learn more about this terrifying epidemic now. Just tune into this recent Gab with the Gurus Radio Show.

Listen now this eye-opening show at http://tinyurl.com/LymeDiseaseGabGurus2010Connie.

My articulate, helpful guests were:

You will be surprised and awed by the insights of these amazing guests, I predict. 

Please read my important op ed now on AOL News now.

Now, listen to this Gab with the Gurus Radio Show about Lyme disease.

To find the show easily, just go here: http://tinyurl.com/LymeDiseaseGabGurus2010Connie

Michelle Obama Gets Food Companies to Act

Michelle Obama Thank to Michelle Obama’s crusade to combat children’s obesity, major food companies such as PepsiCo and Kraft Foods are changing their products.

She is, in fact, “defining defining her role as first lady by taking on the $600 billion food and beverage industries in a quest to end childhood obesity within a generation,” observes Kate Andersen Brower of Bloomberg Business Week, in an artticle entitled, “Michelle Obama’s ‘Spotlight’ on Obesity Enlists Kraft, PepsiCo.”

“Her lobbying of companies to make products healthier, labels easier to read and limit marketing of unhealthy foods to kids is paying off,” Brower observes.

A month after she began her campaign, “PepsiCo Inc., the world’s second-largest food and beverage company, pledged to stop selling full-sugar soft drinks in schools by 2012.” In addition, Kraft Foods Inc., the maker of Oreo cookies and Oscar Mayer lunch meats, jumped on board, announcing that it would further reduce the sodium content of its products..

Reporter Brower points out that the first lady’s efforts are part of a “movement to recast what the food industry is selling,” according to David Kessler, who was Food and Drug Administration commissioner from 1990 to 1997. “She puts the spotlight on the issue like few others can,” Kessler told Brower.

The American Beverage Association — which represents soda companies — has now joined Michelle Obama’s effort by running a national ad, which claims that the industry is committed to reducing beverage calories in schools by 88 percent.

Things started happening after a well-publicized meeting in Washington on March 16 when the first lady addressed members of the Grocery Manufacturers Association, which represents major food companies such as Kraft and PepsiCo. At that GMA meeting, Obama urged the companies to reduce sugar, fat and salt in their products and “to move faster and to go farther” to make them healthier.

The first lady has “accelerated our focus,” Kraft’s president of health and wellness, Rhonda Jordan, told the Bloomberg Business Week reporter Brower, who then quotes Patrick Basham, an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute, a Washington-based research group that promotes libertarian policies.

Basham believes that the first lady’s anti-obesity efforts are “in sync with public skepticism about `the motives of big business’ in the wake of the deepest economic crisis since the Great Depression.” He also believes that the recent moves by the companies may be an effort to prevent government crackdown.

“The food industry is terrified of being either legislated out of business or so regulated they won’t be able to do what they want,” Basham told Brower.

What’s intriguing is that Michelle Obama became concerned about child nutrition for personal reasons.

She told audiences at a National PTA Conference in Arlington, Virginia, on March 10, that she got a “wakeup call” when her pediatrician voiced concern about her family’s eating habits.

While I applaud the first lady’s efforts, as always, no matter what changes the large food companies institute, I encourage people to reduce or even eliminate their consumption of processed foods.

Vegetables and fruits that come courtesy of Mother Nature are best for our bodies. Plus, they taste better — something you’ll discover after you cut back on processed carbs.

We just don’t need to consume large quantities of packaged foods that usually have been extensively processed, with sugar, fat and salt added.

Feel Addicted to Sweets & Other Foods? Junk Food Addiction May be Real

Junk food Do you feel completely out of control when it comes to eating candies, cookies and fast food?

More to the point, do you feel downright addicted?

New research reveals that your affinity — or addiction — may be real, according to new research.

"Researchers … say it's possible that a diet heavy in highly rewarding foods — quite literally, sausages, cheesecake and other highly processed foods — might cause changes in the brain's reward system for satiety." writes HealthNews Today's reporter Jenifer Goodwin.

Read her fascinating story now to learn about this new research.

Would you like help to overcome your sugar addiction?

Learn here about my Break Free of Your Sugar Addiction program. Early Bird rates apply through March 31 at 11:59 pm PST.

Sugar & Its Dangers Hit the News, Thanks to Dr. Robert Lustig’s YouTube Video & Nightline

Recently, both DeGeneres and Jeff Garlin spoke out against sugar and declared that they were off the sweet substance, as I recently wrote about in this opinion piece for AOL News.

Lustig-Sugar-1 Last night, sugar and its dangers hit the news again, thanks to ABC’s popular show, Nightline, which, last night, aired a compelling story spotlighting sugar’s role in the obesity crisis.

In his “Sugar Wars” piece, correspondent John Donovan offers a fascinating look at the views of esteemed pediatric endocrinologist Dr. Robert Lustig, whose YouTube video — entitled “Sugar: The Bitter Truth” — has garnered more than a quarter of a million hits to date and clearly brought Dr. Lustig into the limelight.

In this Nightline segment — which you can watch below — Donovan calls Dr. Lustig “a man at war with sugar,” because he argues that too much fructose and not enough fiber are to blame for our obesity crisis and metabolic syndrome.

“Fructose is the cause of the current epidemic,” insists Dr. Lustig, director of UCSF’s Weight Assessment for Teen and Child Health (WATCH) Clinic and
UCSF Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology.

Nightline correspondent Donovan also includes quotes from the pediatric endocrinologist about how fructose confuses people’s brains into thinking they’re hungry and about how low-fat foods such as SnackWells cookies and fruit-flavored yogurt are filled with sugar. Dr. Lustig even argues that teens should be carded when buying sugary foods.

In the Nightline “Sugar Wars” piece, Donovan strives to be unbiased by allowing Dr. Lustig’s ideas to be refuted by three pro-sugar advocates — one from the American Beverage Association (formerly called the National Soft Drink Association) and two from the Corn Refiners Association, including a cardiologist, who has done studies funded by PepsiCo, the manufacturer of sugar-filled soft drinks.

Understandably, correspondent John Donovan seems to be like millions of Americans, who have a sweet tooth. In fact, the reporter readily admits that strolling with Dr. Lustig at San Francisco’s Pier 30  (a hot spot filled with sugary foods such as waffle cones) can be “at times, well, a bit of of a downer. Because we love sugar, don’t we, most of us?”

Donovan is absolutely correct in his assessment. Most Americans — and people around the world — are so keen on sugar that they imbibe it to their detriment. Unfortunately, the Nightline reporter did not mention that obesity is only part of the sugar story.

The average American’s sugar consumption — about 170 pounds per year per person — also has been linked with heart disease, cancer, severe PMS, memory loss, depression, fatigue, headaches, infertility, low libido, polycystic ovary syndrome and many other ailments.

In addition, regretfully, the Nightline piece did not point out that Dr. Lustig is in good company. His views are shared by many of us concerned health advocates. For instance, esteemed pediatric endocrinologist Dr. David Ludwig — who was previously interviewed along with me for a “CBS News Sunday Morning” segment, “Is America Too Sweet on Sugar” — is among those frightened by the massive consumption of sugar, particularly high fructose corn syrup, in this country and around the world.

Others sounding the sugar alarm include:

Now, I invite you to watch the eye-opening Nightline segment below.

I also encourage you to watch Dr. Lustig’s YouTube video, in which he argues that the current obesity epidemic is due to the marked increase in people’s consumption of fructose over the last 30 years. He also points out that fructose is toxic in large quantities, because it is metabolized in the liver in the same way as alcohol, which drives fat storage and makes the brain think it is hungry.

Finally, I invite you to watch this 3 Minute Ad Age segment, in which I reveal that if you’re eating processed foods, it’s virtually impossible to take in high fructose corn syrup in moderation, as the Corn Refiners Association ads assert.

FYI, this increased awareness about sugar’s dangers comes at an exciting time for me, because next month, I celebrate my 12th year off sugar. If you’d like help to conquer your sugar habit and other bad habits, join the Smart Habits Fans on Facebook to get daily tips.

You’re also invited to learn about my new 5-week, Break Free With Connie teleseminar program, which begins April 20. In honor of my 12th year kick-sugar anniversary, early-bird rates are now in effect.