Is Sitting Killing You?

Will You Move More and Sit Less With Me?

Do you, like millions, sit for hours and hours?

Up until yesterday, I was one of those, who sat far too much.

You see, I’m writing this blog post while swaying my hips, doing squats, balancing on one foot after another, and/or dancing to cool music in front of my new awesome Standing Desk in my new place.

Bye-bye, back pain!

Hello, happier, healthier, slimmer body.

No more sitting for hours on end while in the flow and writing books, talks and blog posts.

You see, for all my intentions to be a healthy, active example, I’ve been naughty for years.

All that sitting has injured my back twice — we’re talking major pain — while I’ve been on deadline for my books, Sugar Shock and Beyond Sugar Shock.

Are you like I was up until recently?

If you sit a lot for work, as most do, you need to learn about the deadly consequences.

Sitting can shorten your life — even if you exercise.

Yes, a recent study in the Annals of Internal Medicine found that there’s a direct relationship between time people spent sitting and their risk of early mortality, according to the researchers, who studied nearly 8,000 adults.

In short, the researchers found that as your total sitting time increases, so does your risk of an early death.

Or, to put it more bluntly, the longer you sit, the sooner you die.

The scientists concluded:  “Both the total volume of sedentary time and its accrual in prolonged, uninterrupted bouts are associated with all-cause mortality, suggesting that physical activity guidelines should target reducing and interrupting sedentary time to reduce risk for death.”

So will you join me? Let’s sit less and move more together.

Spread the word! Join the Sit Less, Move More Movement.

Are You a “Heavy User” of Salty, Sugary, Fatty Foods? Let Michael Moss Open Your Eyes

Diet check-up:  Are you hooked on too much salt sugar and fat?

Join the Conversation: Are you a “heavy user” of salty, sugary or fatty foods? 

salt sugar and fatAre you hooked on salty, sugary or fatty processed foods?

If you wonder why certain packaged food products call out to you often, you must read the brilliant, eye-opening book, Salt, Sugar, Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us from Pulitzer Prize-winning Michael Moss, an investigatve reporter for The New York Times.

Lately, while researching and writing my next book, I haven’t been able to put down the fascinating Salt Sugar Fat.. (Mostly, I’ve been listening to the book via CDs while en route to the gym, Whole Foods or bvusiness meetings. This book was so compelling that I’m now listening to all 12 CDs again.)

Frankly, I’m in awe of Moss and his investigative prowess. Over a period of three-and-a-half years, he interviewed hundreds of industry insiders, who revealed jaw-dropping, inside information about what our favorite food companies do to land space on grocery store shelves, crush the competition, boost the bottom line, please Wall Street, and influence our buying habits so we can’t pass up on foods with salt, sugar and fat.

For those of you, who find yourself frequently buying and eating certain processed chips, cookies or cereals, Moss sheds light on why this may be happening.

The captivating processed food substances you find on supermarket shelves “are knowingly designed—engineered is the better word—to maximize their allure,” Moss writes.

Michael-Moss_credit-Tony-Ce._V374823686_ (2)“Their packaging is tailored to excite our kids,” he continues.

“Their advertising uses every psychological trick to overcome any logical arguments we might have for passing the product by.”

Plus, their “taste is so powerful,” he writes, “we remember it from the last time we walked down the aisle and succumbed, snatching them up. And above all else, their formulas are calculated and perfected by scientists who know very well what they are doing.”

Indeed, those of you, who struggle to peel off pounds and hate that you can’t quit over-consuming your favorite sweet soft drinks, salty chips, or fatty cookies, you need to know that food scientists are actually using cutting-edge technology to calculate the “bliss point” and enhance the “mouthfeel” of your preferred foods so they’ll sell more, Moss explains.

Oh Goodness! Food Companies Call Big Buyers of Processed Foods “Heavy Users”

Perhaps one of the more scary revelations Moss makes in Salt, Sugar Fat is how the food industry regards its ardent customers.

In their board rooms and science labs, food industry insiders call you, their loyal buyers, “heavy users.”

No, I’m not talking about drugs, but, in light of recent food addiction research, that shows how the brain lights up on sugar as it does on cocaine, the term “user” is certainly apt.

And you wonder why your most intense, all-consuming, wild cravings for unnatural, packaged, sugary, salty, fatty foodstuffs swoop in on you often as if they were ravenous vultures waiting for their next dead prey to disembowel?

Sorry for the gross imagery, but as a former sugar-addicted journalist, my goal is not only to educate you, but to help you become strong, alert, and determined to lift your choose-healthy-food muscles when you’re at your favorite supermarket, as well as at drug stores, movie theaters and even hospitals..

By the way, just as I was about to put this post up on this Sugar Shock Blog, I discovered — while catching up on Dr. Oz Show episodes — that yesterday, Moss was featured in an awesome episode, Supermarket Secrets: How They Fool You Into Buying Foods That Make You Fat.

Watch The Dr. Oz Show episode with Moss now.

And bear in mind, as Moss told Dr. Oz, that “when you walk into the store, there are traps.”

With that in mind, it’s best to be prepared with “that shopping list, commit yourself to stick with it, shop when you’re full, shop with a clear mind,” Moss urges.

Let Michael Moss open your eyes now by buying his intriguing book, Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us.

Join the Conversation: Are you a “heavy user” of salty, sugary or fatty foods?

Do you Multi-Task While Eating? It Makes Your Food Taste Bland

Do you multi-task at meal time?

If you eat while on the computer, watching TV or doing other things, this means there’s a good chance you’re over-indulging, too. (So found a variety of studies, which link distraction with mindless bingeing. A review of 24 studies drew that conclusion in the April 2013 edition of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.)

Now, more research published in Psychological Science reveals that doing mentally taxing tasks while you eat will make your food taste bland, too.

In other words, when you juggle too many things at mealtime, you just won’t enjoy or appreciate your food as much.

We don’t want meal time to be dull and unsatisfactory, right?

What’s more, scientists at the Institute for Psychological Research at Leiden University in The Netherlands discovered that when participants ate sour, sweet and salty substances while doing various tasks, they consumed more food and preferred stronger tastes.

In addition doing other things while eating makes your food tastes bland. Indeed, researchers found that an “increased task load reduces people’s taste perception by limiting attentional capacity to assess taste intensity and that people adjust their consumption accordingly.”

In short, the researchers believe that cognitive load may compete with sensory input for our attention.

But let’s focus on the good news, as pointed out by Scientific American’s Tori Rodriguez. Other studies have found you eat less when you pay mindful attention to your food and fully focus on the taste, armona and texture.

The important takeaway, as I see it, is that if you want to peel off the pounds, cut out multi-tasking at meal time.

Besides, as this new study reveals, you’ll enjoy your more, too.

So join me: Mindfully savor each morsel or swallow at each meal or snack.

distracted eating

Sugar at “Safe” Levels Can be Deadly

sugar can be deadlyInevitably, the damning research about sugar keeps pouring in.

Indeed, another study reveals sugar’s deadly dangers — even when consumed in “safe” amounts.

Talk about scary.

The mice died more often, as shared by
Science Daily. Not only that, but they had fewer babies.

For the study, University
of Utah researchers gave mice a diet of 25 percent extra sugar and ran a
sensitive toxicity test. (When you give a mouse 25 percent extra sugar, it’s the equivalent of a healthy human diet, plus three cans of soda daily.)

Although the mice didn’t become obese, the females on the
sugar-added diet died at twice the rate of the control group. In addition, the males on the sugar-added diet produced 25 percent fewer offspring than
the control group and acquired fewer territories, according to a
University of Utah news release.

“These findings represent the lowest level of sugar consumption shown to adversely affect mammalian health,” states the study abstract, published today in the journal Nature Communications.

Does this finding scare you enough to make you want to quit sugar?

If so, I invite you to get help in my latest book, Beyond Sugar Shock: The 6-Week Plan to Break Free of Your Sugar Addiction & Get Slimmer, Sexier & Sweeter. I’m honored that this book, from Hay House, has been praised by a Who’s Who of health and empowerment experts,
including Dr. Wayne Dyer, Dr. Christiane Northrup, and Dr. Daniel Amen.

If you get Beyond Sugar Shock, let me know what you liked most about it.

Is Sugar as Toxic as Alcohol? Researchers Say Yes

Sugar-addiction

In recent years, scientists have theorized that sugar can be as addictive as alcohol or tobacco. 

You, of course, know how easy it is to get hooked on sweets — and how incredibly challenging and difficult it can be to break free of your sugar addiction.

(In fact, because breaking free from sugar is so tough, I've devoted an entire book to take you on a fun, empowering journey so you can easily let go of your addiction. Beyond Sugar Shock — which will be published in June and which you can pre-order now — is designed to hold you by the hand and guide you to what I call Sugar Freedom.)

So since sugar is addictive, should this commonplace but potentially harmful (even deadly) substance be regulated?

Acclaimed researcher Robert Lustig, M.D. and a team of UCSF researchers say yes.

They argue that sugar should be controlled like alcohol and tobacco to protect public health.

Indeed, Dr. Lustig, along with Laura Schmidt, Ph.D., Claire Brindis, D.P.H. and colleagues at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), contend that sugar’s potential for abuse, coupled with its toxicity and pervasiveness in the Western diet, make it a primary culprit of this worldwide health crisis.

They maintain that sugar is fueling a global obesity pandemic, contributing to 35 million deaths annually worldwide from non-communicable diseases like diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

The authors then advocate taxing sugary foods and controlling sales to children under 17.

According to their statistics, reported on CBS New’s HealthPop, worldwide sugar intake has tripled in the last 50 years, and the average person is taking in a whopping 500 calories from added sugar in processed foods alone.

So what do you think? Should sugar be regulated?

A special thank you: Photo credit is due here (flickr) and here (DailyBurn).

Post your ideas here on this Sugar Shock Blog and/or on my Facebook Smart Habits Fans page.

 

The Dark Side of Sugar

Sugar stop Learn more about the Sour Side of Sugar in this fascinating article on DailyRx.com from reporter Laurie Stoneham.

FYI, I'm one of the experts quoted in this story, "The Dark Side of Sweet: Sugar is everywhere and it may just be killing you."

Read this important article on DailyRx now.

Then, tell us: Does this article help inspire you to quit the stuff — or at least reduce your consumption?

If you're stumped as to how to let go of your sugar habit, join me next Thursday week in a free teleseminar.

Sign up here for the program, Fast-Track Secrets to Release Your Sugar Addiction & Shed Excess Weight.

Now, tell us why do you want to quit your sugar addiction?