Do You Get Stressed Out?

Are You One of Millions Who Crave Carbs Under Stress? Cravings-Crushing Monday/Your Motivating Monday

Do you often feel stressed?

If you’re like millions of us in America, Great Britain, and Australia, you get stressed, which may often “make” you do such unhealthy things such as eat (or, more likely, overeat) processed carbs and sugary snacks and do other unhealthy things.

Today is the first in a series of blog posts in which I help you discover Simple Ways to Shut Down Stress. No need to rush anymore to processed carbs and sugary snacks to unwind, calm down and soothe you.

Now, let’s find out which stresses are now applicable for you.

Admittedly, the inspiration for writing about stress grew out of my own massive, seemingly endless, overpowering stress in the past four years, ever since I moved across country for my dying Mom; helplessly watched for a year while she lost the battle to lung cancer; moved several times (now for the fifth or sixth time); got walloped by carb cravings, overate carbs (which was initially quite embarrassing), gained 21 pounds (which I’ve now lost); recovered from PTSD, started a new life in another part of the country, etc.

Admittedly, I haven’t handled this persistent stress the best on many occasions, so I decided to get tips from fellow health experts on How to Shut Down Stress. I got many ideas from a number of amazing colleagues, who are active in the health and wellness Mindshare Summit Facebook Group, created by JJ Virgin, bestselling author of The Sugar Impact Diet, and most recently, Miracle Mindset: A Mother, Her Son, and Life’s Hard Lessons.

Now I’m stressed out (that’s a joke) about how to write about stress, because these fabulous health experts had so many ideas that I just couldn’t put all their tiips into one blog post.  Because they shared so many brilliant suggestions, I decided to turn this into a series of blog posts about stress.

To begin talking about stress, let’s turn to health psychologist and Stanford University Kelly McGonigal, who offers a revolutionary look about stress — that it’s not necessarily bad.

Thanks to Mindshare Summit colleague Dr Alan Christianson, author of the New York Times bestselling book, The Adrenal Reset Diet, who suggested that we look at stress in a different way.

“…maybe all you have to do is not be stressed about your stress,” Alan pointed out. “Those who see it as excitement seem to bypass the physiological damage.”

He then suggested that you and I watch  McGonigal’s 2013 TED talk, “How to Make Stress Your Friend,” which is one of the 20 Most Viewed TED talks of all time, with 10 million views. The author of the Upside of Stress points out that the goal is not to get rid of stress but to get better at understanding, embracing and using it.

Join the Conversation: So what was your biggest takeaway from McGonigal’s TED talk?

The Best Superfood is Cacao (Chocolate), But It Doesn’t Need Sugar

21 Reasons Cacao is One of the Best Superfoods: Share Your Favorite Recipe

Today is National Chocolate Day.

You may be surprised to learn that I’m a huge fan of real chocolate (cacao).

Now, bear in mind that I’m not recommending creamy, sugar-filled, calorie-laden, commercially processed stuff.

No, I’m referring to the real stuff — to deep, dark, sophisticated, raw, sugar-free cacao or Theobroma cacao, “food of the gods,” which is the source of original, natural chocolate.

And I bring you great news:  When you cut out sugar or even dairy, you can still enjoy amazing, tasty, healthy cacao.

Many health experts consider cacao, which is rich in minerals and plant compounds such as polyphenols and flavonoids, the healthiest food in the world.

Of course, back in 1998, before I quit sugar, the kinds of chocolate I overate — and which, I imagine, you overeat — were full of those vegetable oils, GMO soy lecithin, milk and sugar.

Now, I’m so impressed by cacao’s remarkable resume. Thease are some of its many wonders:

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The Lyme Disease-Sugar Connection

Get Surprised & Helped with the Chronic Lyme Disease Summit

“Beverly Hills” housewife Yolanda Foster. “Soprano’s” star Jamie-Lynn Sigler. Singer Avril Lavigne. Actress Ashley Olsen. Singer Daryl Hall.Actor Richard Gere. Model Christy Turlington. The list goes on and on.

These celebs have reportedly suffered from Lyme disease, which now debilitates a staggering number of people in the United States. In fact, 300,000 people are infected with Lyme disease each year. Unfortunately, many of these victims are suffering from the worst-case scenario: Chronic Lyme Disease.

Do any of these symptoms sound familiar: Headaches, chills, swollen glands, muscle and joint pain and/or mental confusion?

You may not have a cold or flu. You may have Lyme disease.

It’s my honor and privilege to particulate in the Chronic Lyme Disease Summit (www.chroniclymediseasesummit.com), an online program, which you can listen to for free from Monday, April 4 to Monday, April 11.

The Chronic Lyme Disease Summit is an important event because it can give valuable, much-needed information to those, who’ve been misdiagnosed or are baffled by their unexplained symptoms.

Fact: You don’t need a visible bull’s eye rash or tick bite to prove that you have Lyme disease.

Another startling fact: More people are affected by Lyme disease each year than breast cancer.

During the Chronic Lyme Disease Summit, host Dr. Jay Davidson, who nearly lost his wife to chronic Lyme disease, will be interviewing me.

Kudos to Jay. Because of his wife’s struggles, he became prompted him to do lots of research and help others heal.

During this Chronic Lyme Disease Summit, you’ll learn about diagnosis, testing, an understanding of Lyme disease, cutting-edge information and research, plus practical health tips to get your life back on track.

Now you may be wondering: Why in the world would a sugar expert be so interested in sharing information about Lyme disease?

Read on to learn why.

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Take Garlic to Fight Colds

Oops! I've Been Sick -- Now Taking More Garlic

Maybe you’ve been on a plane. Or in a restaurant or mall. The sound in the air isn’t music playing. It’s the never-ending hacking of those, who are suffering with colds.

Unfortunately, for the past two weeks, I’ve been recuperating from my own monstrous, end-of-winter upper respiratory bug. (That’s why I had to take time to recuperate and therefore haven’t posted lately. There’s nothing like getting sick to make you do lots of planning. So I’ve laying the groundwork for some exciting programs. Stay tuned for details.)

Lately, since I eat so healthily, I’m trying to figure out what I could have done differently (other than those couple of nights when I didn’t get enough sleep). Oops. I overlooked garlic.  I just couldn’t follow my friend’s advice to inhale it before catching a plane. (No one would have wanted to sit near me!)

Now I want to share some fascinating facts about this powerhouse, which I’ve been putting into in soups for the last couple of days.

Indeed, garlic is a great way to avoid your dripping nose and loud cough in the first place.

Indeed, according to a study done by British scientists who tracked 146 healthy adults over 12 weeks, those who selected to receive a daily garlic supplement came down with 24 colds during the study period, compared twitch 65 colds in the placebo group.

Here are some juicy tidbits about garlic and why it’s one of your best stay-healthy weapons:

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Why We Overeat: The Toxic Food Environment & Obesity

What do a Bagel & a Candy Bar Have in Common?

Ever wondered why we overeat?

why we overeatDo you or your loved ones overeat? Have you or your family members been gaining unwanted excess weight? Are you concerned about our obesity crisis?

To gain insights into why two-thirds of us are getting fatter and sicker, I urge you to watch a video of this fascinating panel discussion, “Why We Overeat: The Toxic Food Environment & Obesity,” thanks to the Harvard School of Public Health and the Huffington Post.

I came across this fabulous video while doing research for research for my next book, Crush Your Crazy Carb Cravings™.

This program presented an illustrious panel, which included:

  • Walter Willett, Chair, Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, and Fredrick John Stare Professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition
  • David Kessler, Former Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco; and Author, The End of Overeating: Taking Control of the Insatiable American Appetite
  • Dariush Mozaffarian, Associate Professor in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School and
  • Michael Rich, Director, Center on Media and Child Health, Boston Children’s Hospital
  • Plus, the “Why We Overeat” panel was moderated brilliantly by Meredith Melnick, Editorial Director for HuffPost Healthy Living.

This program has many fascinating points. In particular, I urge you to pay attention to these fascinating comments from Dr. Mozaffarian:

“Now sugar, I agree that sugar is a problem, but sugar is no greater a problem than totally unsweetened refined grains. And the worry I have about just focusing on sugar, it gives the refined grains, it gets them off the hook.

“So white bread, all refined cereals that have no added sugar at all, they say zero sugar on the panel, those are just as bad. And when we’ve looked at populations of hundreds of thousands of people, the weight gain associated with Skittles is exactly the same weight gain that is associated with Corn Flakes or white bread or a bagel. So to think that a bagel, that has no sugar, is different than candy is really misleading. …”

Also, I invite you to keep watching to check out the second video (at 59:00) from the HBO film, Weight of the Nation, .where you can discover which beverages contain the most sugar content, thanks to The WATCH Nutrition Clinic.

I’d love to hear what you think about this video.

 

Watch the video here. (I had to take it down, because it would automatically play every time you came to my Sugar Shock Blog.

Join the Conversation. What is your biggest Ahah! from this “Why We Overeat” video?

Special thanks to www.NoGrainer.com for the artwork on this blog. Given that I’m on tight deadline for my next book, I didn’t verify that it was okay to use this artwork. So, if I posted this and shouldn’t have, please let me know, and I’ll be happy to take it down.

FDA to Include Added Sugars on Nutrition Labels

Added sugars will be singled out for the first time, according to proposed label changes from the United States Food and Drug Administration.

This is very good news for those of us, who’ve been warning people about sugar’s dangers and who’ve been trying to help people reduce their consumption of potentially harmful sweeteners.

What you’ll see are two lines of information for the total amount of sugar contained.

One line will say, “Sugars,” and another line will state “Added Sugars,” according to the FDA.

By offering information about “Added Sugars,” this will help consumers to cut back on their sugar consumption. which the U.S. government now recommends.

It’s reassuring that the FDA is now making efforts to educate consumers about of how much sugar occurs naturally in a product, and how much has been added.

Other changes you’ll see will include:

  • Updated serving sizes, which will make it clearer for products that are consumed in one sitting. (You’ll find dual column labels that indicate both “per serving” and “per package” calorie and nutrition information for larger packages that could be consumed in one sitting or multiple sittings.)
  • Calorie information will be provided in a bigger font and bolder. Serving sizes would be bold, too. (The proposed label “would drive attention to calories and serving sizes,” Michael R. Taylor, the FDA’s deputy commissioner for foods and veterinary medicine, said in a statement.
  • The new labels would take out Calories from Fat. (This decision was to show type of fat rather than amount so that consumers can choose products lower in saturated and trans fats.)

Changes Won’t Happen For 2 Years

Unfortunately, consumers won’t see changes right away. Food companies will have two years to comply with the new requirements, according to the FDA.

Even though this will take some time, the FDA’s plans are exciting, because they’re designed to reflect the latest scientific information, including the link between diet and chronic diseases such as obesity and heart disease.

Learn about other FDA food label changes here.

Sugars on nutrition labelsSpecial thanks to Karl Tate, who created the above infographic for LiveScience.