Did NSA Leaders Forget to Google “Platform” Before Stomping on Michael Hyatt’s Brand? – Resolved!

Platform-theater-300x272I’m thrilled to report that the National Speakers Association has abandoned the name Platform, which leaves the wonderful Michael Hyatt able to continue his fabulous work to build their platforms. See Shep’s video annoucement.

Here’s the old post:

At its annual conference in San Diego this week, the National Speakers Association — which has been advancing the speaking profession since 1973 —  announced that it was changing its name to “Platform.”

Huh?

Wait a minute!

As I sat in the audience at this year’s NSA conference — which was really fabulous, by the way — this name change completely confused me.

More accurately, I felt very sorry for Michael Hyatt, the wildly acclaimed blogger, speaker and New York Times bestselling author of the fabulous book, Platform: Get Noticed in a Noisy World. which, incidentally, is a must read for any speaker or author.

I sympathized with Michael — former CEO of Thomas Nelson Publishers — because for years, he has contributed his brilliance, mined his creativity and allocated his hard-earned resources to invigorate and popularize the word, “Platform.”

For those of you not in the know about platforms, having one is imperative these days if you have a book, product, or talk. Learn about it from Michael Hyatt. (I also recommend that you read Seth Godin’s brilliant book, Tribes.)

As you may have guessed by now, I am a BIG fan of Michael Hyatt, which is why I’m posting off topic today.

Not only do I follow Michael’s blog and posts on his Facebook page, but I also often consult and implement his ideas from Platform: Get Noticed in a Noisy World. I’ve even traveled across country to attend one of Michael’s conferences, and I plan to fly to another one later this year.

Now you can understand why I”m so appalled and dismayed by the National Speakers Association’s name change to “Platform.”

How can the NSA do this to Michael Hyatt, who is, in effect, The Platform Man?

  • To begin with, Michael has a big platform of very engaged, loyal followers like me. Those of us in his tribe avidly read his thoughts on Facebook; follow him on Twitter;, check out his emails; and travel to attend events where he’s keynoting.
  • And consider this: Michael’s platform — at least on Facebook (41,770) and Twitter (224,000) — is far bigger than that of the National Speakers Association, which has only 16,824 fans in its private Facebook group and only 11,600 followers on Twitter.
  • Meanwhile, Michael Hyatt also runs his fabulous Platform University, of which I’m a member.
  • Furthermore, he hosts the acclaimed Platform Conference.
  • Michael also offers services to help speakers, authors and people like you and me build our platforms. By the way, stay tuned for my new, classier look, which soon will be unveiled on my website and blog, thanks to Michael’s Get Noticed theme.

PlatformNSASo why the heck is the reputable National Speakers Association — which prides itself on authenticity, originality and even ingenuity — stomping on the toes of Michael Hyatt, who, as a sought-after speaker, is essentially one of their own?

Frankly, I’m disappointed and surprised by this questionable move by the National Speakers Association.

Platform-Infographic-5701Indeed, this ill-advised name change puts me in an extremely awkward position.

I’m not yet a full-fledged member of NSA, but I’m a member of the amazing NSA Academy so I can develop skills to become a better speaker, which, in turn, will help me build my platform.

Plus, I greatly respect the many talented, remarkable NSA speakers, some of whom are bestselling authors with remarkable platforms of their own.

Furthermore, I’ve been eagerly looking forward to getting my NSA speaker certification.

Meanwhile, I certainly appreciate the NSA conventions, which, as I witnessed this week and in previous years, are classy, professional events.

But none of this changes the fact that NSA taking the name “Platform” is NOT a classy move.

More to the point, this name-change is completely lacking in integrity, a trait that many NSA members seek to possess. (See Kathleen Ann Thompson’s clever blog post about this.)

Not only that, but the NSA name change violates the organization’s own code of ethics, as Stu McLaren observes.

In short, my loyalty lies with Michael Hyatt, who expressed his astonishment in a Facebook post.

By the way, I even urge you to see the helpful infographic (to your left) that Michael created to help people like us build our platforms.

Frankly, I’m barffled. Didn’t the NSA name- rebranding committee — whose members were praised in the video below — do their homework or due diligence, as platform builder and blogger Daniel Decker asks?

Didn’t at least one member of this illustrious name-change committee do a Google search on the word “Platform” before stomping on Michael Hyatt’s brand and look?

Dian’t at least one committee member hear of Michael Hyatt?

It’s super easy to discover, as Mike Kim so eloquently blogs,.that Michael Hyatt “owns” the word, “Platform.”

Go ahead. Do a Google search now for the words, “Platform and Michael Hyatt.”

As of today, you’ll get a whopping 157,000 hits!

Isn’t t the NSA name change, in fact, brand theft, as Andy Traub suggests?

As you can tell, a number of us in Michael’s tribe are up in arms.

Sure, the concept of a platform has been dicussed for years in publishing and speaking circles and books that predate Michael’s have addressed this subject — but of all people today, Michael Hyatt is the go-to guru about the value of building your platform.

In fact, Hay House, publisher of my most recent book, Beyond Sugar Shock, even recommends that ALL of its authors or wanna-be authors read Michael Hyatt’s book, Platform: Get Noticed in a Noisy World.Likewise, my next publisher, Balboa Press, which has a partnership with Hay House, greatly respects Michael.

Of course, despite my background as an objective journalist, I make no claims to this being a measured post such as those by Ryan Avery or Stu McLaren.

What it comes down to is this: How can a speakers’ organization, which touts the value of crediblity and not stealing others’ material, in effect, create a name and logo that are uncannily similiar to one used for years by Michael Hyatt — whether they did so knowingly or not?

Now, I urge you: Put yourself in Michael Hyatt’s place. How would you feel if one day some organization took the name you’ve been spending years to brand?

I’d certainly be concerned if an organization with similiar goals to mine changed its name to Sugar Shock or Beyond Sugar Shock.

Therefore, as a Michael Hyatt fan, I urge the leadership of the National Speakers Association to:

  • Issue a formal apology to Michael Hyatt.
  • Totally abandon the name “Platform” as its new name.
  • Do due diligence and extensive research to ensure that it won’t again pick a brand that is already taken by another person or organization.
  • Make this entire name-change process more public and enlist feedback from ALL members of NSA and the Academy.

Please weigh in with your ideas. I’d love to hear what you think, but first, watch the video below where the name change (theft?) to Platform is announced at the recent National Speakers Association conference.

Join the conversation. So do you think the NSA name change is right or not? Speak up now. Also please share your comments with NSA leadership.

 

Salt, Sugar, Fat: Michael Moss Reveals How the Food Industry Addicted Us

Join the Conversation. What most surprised you from this fascinating interview with Michael Moss?

 

Salt, Sugar, FatLately, I’ve been planning the Sugar World Summit, which will feature some of the biggest names in sugar education, carb addiction, health, wellness, mindful eating, and personal empowerment.

For instance, in this virtual event, which will take place two weeks before Halloween, Dr. Mark Hyman, Dr. Robert Lustig, JJ Virgin, Dr. Richard Johnson, Colette Baron-Reid, Sarah Wilson and many others will join us to give you The Sour Scoop or Sweet Solutions.

Anyhow, while preparing for the event, I came across this fascinating NPR interview with Pulitzer-Prize winning investigative journalist Michael Moss, author of the extraordinary book, Salt, Sugar, Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us..

In his fascinating book, Moss takes an insightful look at the $1 trillion processed food industry, which most health experts believe has triggered the obesity epidemic and put millions at risk for such chronic health conditions as heart disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer.

Thanks to his many revealing interviews with leading food scientists and top food industry executives from companies such as Kraft and Coca-Cola, Moss explains how most Americans have become so dependent on processed food.

Get shocked now, thanks to this intriguing NPR interview.

 

Join the Conversation. What was your biggest A-hah?

Sugar Shocker! Can You Believe It? Under Lock and Key

Since 1998, while quitting sugar on doctor’s orders, the subject has astounded and enthralled me. In short, I’ve been absolutely astonished by a variety of Sugar Shockers! Today begins a new Sugar Shocker! feature, which I’ll post from time to time. As you may know, I included a variety of Sugar Shockers in my first book, Sugar Shock (2007). Here’s the first such entry.

SUGAR SHOCKER! FinalIt’s hard to believe, but as William Dufty recounts in his landmark book, Sugar Blues, refined white sugar was locked up back in the 16th and 17th centuries in Europe and America.

At the time, the substance was so expensive (the equivalent of about $30 a pound or a year’s salary for the average working man) that it was considered a delicacy reserved for the very wealthy, and the nobility certainly didn’t want their servants stealing such an exorbitantly expensive substance.

To this day, Unani healers or hakims in Afghanistan reportedly keep sugar under lock and key, believing it to be a narcotic.

Excerpted from my book, Sugar Shock! How Sweets and Simple Carbs Can Derail Your Life — And How You Can Get Back on Track (p. 133).

If you know of any Sugar Shockers, please let me know so I can feature it on this Sugar Shock Blog.

Join the convversation. What do you think about this Sugar Shocker? Tell us now.

It’s Easy to Get Duped by Food Labels

If you’re trying to cut out sugar or curtail your consumption of it to shed weight, manage your hypoglycemia or type 2 diabetes, or reduce your risk of heart disease, you need to read food labels if and when you buy packaged foods.

That’s because many foods may contain sugar, even if you don’t think they do.

And if you rush while shopping at the supermarket, you’ll never know about the hidden sugars.

After 15 years of being mostly sugar-free, you’d think I would have known better to catch sweetened foods.

But darn, I forgot to t follow my own advice last night, because I was really hungry and hurriedly snapped up a few items so I could hurry home to cook my dinner.

Sure enough, I got duped by tasty-looking crumbled goat cheese, which I’d been eagerly looking forward to adding to my salad..

Photos 11-20-13 068

It wasn’t until I got home and was close to opening the package when I realized my oversight.

My crumbled goat cheese contained sugar. In fact, it had 4 grams or 1 teaspoon, enough to cause havoc in my sugar-sensitive body.

Of course, if I’d taken a moment to read the label while still at the grocery store, I would have quickly caught the sugar and been able to buy unsweetened goat cheese instead.

No wonder people get so confused when buying packaged foods.

No wonder people eat lots of added sugars without even realizing it.

 

Talk Join the Conversation

Share your experiences. Tell us about your food label challenges.

Question to : When did a food label trap or tick you? And how did you feel after eating the food?

 

 

Eat All the Pancakes You Want & Leave Happy, Ad Says. Huh? Wrong!

EggnogPancakes Frankly, I don't get it. Here we are in the midst of a horrific nationwide obesity epidemic, and a certain national chain is now enticing people and tempting them via a TV ad to eat can eat all the pancakes they want and leave happy!

You've got to be kidding!

Eating as many pancakes as your heart desires will not make you happy!

Isn't it more accurate to say: "Eat all the pancakes you want, especially ones smothered in butter and syrup, and leave feeling bloated, gross and angry at yourself for pigging out!"

Just imagine: After you eat a pile of pancakes, you'll probably say, "Ugh! I can't believe I ate all those pancakes! I'm so unhappy!"

Wait, that's not all! Let's assume the restaurant's deal really entices you. So, after overeating for several days running on all that sugar (think syrup), fat (butter) and those refined carbs or sugar (the pancakes work in your body like sugar), you can expect to get even more unhappy when you look on the bathroom scale!

Admittedly, you may feel "happy" ever so briefly. In other words, you'll be upbeat and "high" from all the sugar and refined carbs for maybe 1/2 hour or even an hour. But soon, you'll come crashing down and reality will set in. Unfortunately, you may even have more sugar cravings later that day.

What baffles me is that this particular eatery does sell other food fare that's not carb-centered. How can this company permit their ad agency to create such a politically incorrect ad in this weight-worrying climate? Why not promote all-you-can-eat salads or something more healthy instead?

In case you believed the TV bunk that eating pancakes to your heart's delight can will make you happy, I'd recommend that you learn about the dangers of all those refined carbs and sugars. Would you like to be healthy and happy? If so, then gobbling pancakes is not the answer.

Eating pancakes, along with other processed carbs and sweets can, over time, lead to health troubles galore, from heart disease to cancer to type 2 diabetes, as you can learn my book SUGAR SHOCK!

Still want some pancakes? I hope not!

Stay tuned for my healthy "pancake" recipe, which I'll post here tomorrow,

Children Are Likely Watching Junk Food Ads on Nickelodeon

Fat kid watching TV 6a00d834520ed269e20105361768fc970c-320wi Whenever children watch the popular children's network Nickelodeon, nearly 80 percent of food ads they see are promoting foods of poor nutritional quality,
according to an analysis conducted by the Center for Science in the Public Interest.

This is only "a modest and not quite statistically significant drop
from 2005, when CSPI researchers found that about 90 percent of food
ads on Nick were for junk food," CSPI announced.

The watchdog organization points out that between the two studies (in 2005 and 2009), the
food industry instituted a self-regulatory program through the Council
of Better Business Bureaus, the Children’s Food and Beverage
Advertising Initiative
(CFBAI).

Cookie crisp - gm ccok cisp Listen to what else CSPI discovered with advertising from food companies that
participate in the "self-regulatory program."

Of 452 foods and
beverages that companies claim are acceptable to market to children, 267, or nearly 60 percent, do NOT meet CSPI's recommended
nutrition standards for food marketing to children, such as General
Mills' Cookie Crisp
and Reese’s Puffs cereals, Kellogg Apple Jacks and
Cocoa Krispies cereals, Kellogg Rice Krispies Treats, Campbell's
Goldfish crackers and SpaghettiOs, Kraft Macaroni & Cheese, and
many Unilever Popsicles.

"While industry self-regulation is providing some useful
benchmarks, it's clearly not shielding children from junk food
advertising, on Nick and elsewhere," said CSPI nutrition policy
director Margo G. Wootan.

"It's a modest start, but not sufficient to
address children’s poor eating habits and the sky-high rates of
childhood obesity."

"Nickelodeon should be ashamed that it earns so much money from
carrying commercials that promote obesity, diabetes, and other health
problems in young children," Wootan said. "If media and food companies
don't do a better job exercising corporate responsibility when they
market foods to children, Congress and the FTC will need to step in to
protect kids’ health."

Wootan makes some valid points. Nick should be embarrassed by the fact that so many TV ads pitch junk foods that can lead to obesity, diabetes and more. 

It's time, I believe, for the government to step in to prevent junk food advertising to kids.