Announcements

How to Skip Overeating This Thanksgiving: 3 Simple Tips for a Sweeter, Slimming Holiday

Posted on

Every Thanksgiving, being grateful often takes a back seat to over-indulging at family gatherings.
Gulping down fast-acting, processed carbohydrates, sugar-loaded desserts, and gluten-rich foods is far more common than pleasurably savoring the various culinary concoctions.
20101117-stuffingFor many, Thanksgiving means they’ll go into Sugar Shock and Carb Shock (as I dub it), and develop “Grain Brain,” as Dr. David Perlmutter puts it in his book of the same name.
In fact, I predict that on Thanksgiving, most Americans will overeat, especially those culplrit carbs.
It’s simply a given that you’ll over-indulge on this holiday. One gym even suggested that you “work out before you pig out.” Aargh!
It’s time to ignore the insidious programming that drives you to overeat on Thanksgiving.
Even if you’ve stuffed yourself at previous holiday feasts, instead this Thanksgiving you can achieve Sweet Freedom.
To begin the Sweet Freedom Thanksgiving Funcise (Fun Exercise), think ahead to the day after Thanksgiving,
Choose now not to get an upset stomach. Plan now not to pig out. Select the smarter choice — to savor the sweet holiday experience.
This Thanksgiving, you can easily shift your attention away from those cunning carbs and desserts, which most Americans over-consume and which ample research shows can contribute to more than 100-plus diseases and ailments, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease, type 2 diabetes, and even an early death.
It’s time to take back your Sugar Power and Carb Control. This Thanksgiving, you can avoid being overly tempted by:
Cranberries, a super-healthy food that’s generally downgraded by adding gobs of sugar.
Yams or sweet potatoes, whose inherent nutrient-goodness is often destroyed on Thanksgiving by adding unnecessary brown sugar and marshmallows.
Stuffing, which generally contains gluten galore. (Use Dr. Sarah Gottlieb’s awesome gluten-free, sugar-free recipe instead.)
Pumpkin pie, which is a far cry from the delectable, nutritious, fiber-rich vegetable and weight-loss ally, as Dr. Jonny Bowden points out. The dessert you usually get a Thankisviing is weighed down by sugary, fatty ingredients; features a gluten-rich crust; and is slathered by whipped cream.
Gravy-sodden turkey.
Here’s a three-part simple way to skip over-indulging this Thanksgiving and take leisurely, sociable tastes instead. (I recommend you take two to four small bites maximium of each dish.)
But before you dig into those tantalizing carb creations, just ask yourself these three simple questions:
Would I rather overeat [fill in name of food(s)] tonight and feel sluggish, fuzzy-headed, and cranky tomorrow (for up to three days afterwards)? OR would I rather have a slim, healthy body and mind? (If you have weight to lose, this thought can stop you from over-indulging.)
Would I rather overeat those carbs or sweets or enjoy the good company of family and friends on this special day?
Wouldn’t I rather feel better about myself by shifting my focus from the carb-food to gratitude, which, of course, is supposed to be the whole point of this celebration? Remind yourself that night of list of “5 Things for Which I’m Most Grateful.”
This simple, three-part mental exercise can take your attention away from those potentially harmful carb substasnces and instead put you on the path toward feeling good and enjoying your life -– not just on this holiday but during the whole holiday season ahead.
Have a sweet, joyous and healthy Thanksgiving.
New to this Sugar Shock Blog? Connie Bennett is a former lethargic, dejected sugar-addicted journalist, who reluctantly quit sugar on doctor’s orders in 1998 after being pummeled by 44 strange ailments (brain fog, heart palpitations, mood swings, etc.). Now, 15 years later, the energetic, uplifting Connie spreads the word that Life is Sweeter When Sugar Doesn’t Seduce You™. She is recognized as the Sweet Freedom Coach, and she is a life coach, health coach, blogger, and motivational speaker, who has helped thousands of sugar and carb addicts worldwide. Connie is author of two bestselling books, Sugar Shock and Beyond Sugar Shock, which have been praised by many acclaimed health gurus and celebrities, including America’s Favorite Doctor, Dr. Mehmet Oz, as well as Dr. Wayne Dyer, Dr. Christiane Northrup, Dr. Daniel Amen, Brian Tracy, Bernie Siegel, Mark Sisson, Marci Shimoff, John Assaraff, JJ Virgin, Katie Dolgin (“High Voltage”), and Jimmy Moore.
Subscribe to this Sugar Shock Blog and like Connie on her Facebook fan page.

General

Thanksgiving Triggers Many to Mindlessly Nosh or Overeat: 11 Tips to be Moderate

Posted on

Thanksgiving is a time to give gratitude.
However, for millions of Americans, appreciation tends to take a back seat to high-calorie, sugar-filled foods, sweet drinks and alcoholic beverages.
Unfortunately, overeating on Thanksgiving is the norm for many.
What’s more, for many, that feast marks the beginning of a downhill battle for many people.
In fact, Thanksgiving is like the gateway meal (think gateway drug). You see, this late November feast serves as a trigger, which ushers in a a month-long time to Mindlessly Nosh or Overeat.
And that inevitably leads to weight gain for many.
Think about it: How many people do you know who do NOT overeat on Thanksgiving?
In fact, I dare you to find 10 close friends or relatives who don’t overeat at this meal. And make sure to let me know when you find them.
Rest assured, though, you don’t have to fall into the Thanksgiving pigging-out trap.
Here are 10 Tips to be Moderate on Thanksgiving so you can have a joyous, thankful holiday, not one where you begin a slide into weight gain, fatigue and fuzzinesss.
1. See Yourself the Morning After
One way to prevent Thanksgiving overeating and “sinning” — i.e., over indulging on) sweets, candied yams, pumpkin pie and stuffing — is to pretend that you’re talking to a friend or loved one the next day and openly sharing what happened at your feast. What would you say to this person? Would you be embarrassed? Would you be too mortified to tell her or him that you lost control? My clients find that having to honestly dish the dirt to a loved one can prevent them from overeating.
2. Do the Timed Breath, Blow-Out Technique
When you’re at a Thankgiving meal and sweets, carbs or other rich food “call out” to you, let your watch or cell phone guide you to slow down. Before you shove that second (or even first) serving of mashed potatoes or candied yams into your mouth:
* Check the time on your watch or cell phone. (If you have neither, ask someone else.)
* Then, whatever time it is, take that number of breaths — but do so slowly, deliberately and confidently, breathing in and out slowly.
* Example: So, it’s let’s say it’s 9 am. That means you’ll slowly, consciously take 9 deep breaths in and 9 breaths out.
* At the same time, visualize your breath just whooshing or blowing away your craving up into the skay. (You can pretend that you’re breathing away your cravings as if they were gentle clouds.) Expect that to occur. Now, watch your cravings go poof.
* If you’re still tempted and are close to pigging out, repeat the whole procedure again. (You’ll take another 9 breaths.)
* If that still doesn’t work and your cravings are really strong, then you can really buckle up. Take 9 breaths 9 times. (If it were 3 pm, then you’d do 3 breaths 3 times, etc.)