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Label Added Sugars, Urges Coalition of Health Organizations Such as the Environmental Working Group and the American Heart Association

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Exciting news for those of us who monitor our sugar intake — and urge you to do so, too — for the sake of your health, weight, and moods!

A coalition of health organizations, including the Environmental Working Group, the American Association for Health Education, the American Heart Association, the Center for Science in the Public Interest, and Defeat Diabetes Foundation are calling on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to clearly label added sugars on ingredients lists of packaged foods so that American shoopers find it easier to eat healthier. 

"By showing 'added sugars' on the ingredients lists of foods, consumers will be better able to evaluate the foods they purchase," the organizations wrote in a letter dated Feb. 23, 2012 to the Honorable Margaret Hamburg, M.D., FDA Commissioner.

"To ensure consumers have this important information, we feel that the term 'added sugars' should be listed as a single food ingredient with a paranthetical list of the specific ingredients that account for those sugars," the letter contends.

The groups then go on to suggest that "added sugars should be listed by descending weight, in line with current regulations. The combined weight of the added sugars should be used to determine where added sugars rank on the food ingredients label."

I cannot emphasize how great this would be!

Your life would be so much easier when you buy packaged foods. You'd find it easier to monitor your intake of sugar, which can cause you to age quickly, get heart disease, become depressed, and many other ailments. (You can read about sugar harms you in my first book, Sugar Shock.)

In short, if food labeling such as this went into effect, you wouldn't be so easily deceived and duped by all those added sugars!

The welcome letter to the FDA  Commissioner also cited the American Heart Association's valuable national survey data that "overconsumption of added sugars contributes to obesity" and that the average American consumes 22.2 teaspoons of added sugars per day or the equivalent of 355 calories. (I believe for many, they consume far more than this.) The AHA recommends that women get only 100 daily calories from added sugars and men only 150 calories. 

In addition, the letter states that while "a healthy, well-balanced diet contains naturally occurring sugars, the `empty calories' from added sugars like high fructose corn syrup, sucrose and corn sweetener have a detrimental effect on our diets."

Make sure to tell these organizations such as the Environmental Working Group, the American Heart Association, The American Association for Health Education, the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), and Corporate Accountability International how much you appreciate their hard work on behalf of your health.

Read the complete letter here.

Then go to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Facebook page and show your support for labeling added sugars. 

And tell us what you think, too. 

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