Connie’s Sugar-Free, Gluten-Free, Coconut Cacao Nib Cookies

Make Healthy Treats in this Season of Sugar Overload

Recently, a major cookie company sought my business during The Season of Sugar Overload, as I call it.

Obviously, the firm didn’t realize that its snazzy, color photos of sugary, buttery, super-sweet concoctions would NOT appeal to me, a dedicated anti-sugar advocate since 1998, when I quit sugar on doctor’s orders.

Indeed, I feel so healthy, energetic and happy by staying sugar-free — as I have for the past 17 years — that easily abstain.

But what about the millions of people who also received this or another tempting catalog filled with sugar-filled “goodies” galore? Inevitably, many will succumb to the holiday marketing hype and order cookies.

In fact, 39 percent of 3,000 shoppers surveyed said they were likely to buy gifts through the mail such as with a mail order cookie catalog, according to a 2015 nationwide survey of 3,000 people performed by Epsilon.

But you, dear reader, need to know that continually loading up on sugary, carb-loaded junk can leave you feeling terrible and harm your long-term health.

But, wait. You can enjoy yourself this holiday season. And you indulge in yummy, health-supportive ways.

To show you how you can enjoy healthy, sugar-free treats, I’m sharing my recipe for Connie’s Sugar-Free, Gluten-Free, Coconut Cacao Nib Cookies.

This paleo-style recipe, sweetened with low-glycemic index stevia, won’t mess with your waistline or blood sugar levels.

Not only are these cookies gluten-free, nut-free and vegan, but this nourishing treat features superfoods such as coconut, which contains immune system-strengthening lauric acid and medium chain fatty acids, which keep your cardiovascular system strong.

Then, instead of sugary chocolate chips, Connie’s Clean Coconut Cacao Nib Cookies features a smattering of antioxidant-strong cacao nibs. (That’s basically raw, unprocessed, unsweetened chocolate.

Let me know how you and your family like them!

Connie’s Paleo Coconut Cacao Nib Cookies

Makes about 12

Rich with the immune-system-boosting benefits of coconut flour, coconut oil and cacao, this “Connie-approved” cookie is not only nourishing, but it’s delicious. Plus, you can eat one without worrying that it will set off a tsunami of rebound sugar cravings.

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Michelle Obama Gets Food Companies to Act

Michelle Obama Thank to Michelle Obama’s crusade to combat children’s obesity, major food companies such as PepsiCo and Kraft Foods are changing their products.

She is, in fact, “defining defining her role as first lady by taking on the $600 billion food and beverage industries in a quest to end childhood obesity within a generation,” observes Kate Andersen Brower of Bloomberg Business Week, in an artticle entitled, “Michelle Obama’s ‘Spotlight’ on Obesity Enlists Kraft, PepsiCo.”

“Her lobbying of companies to make products healthier, labels easier to read and limit marketing of unhealthy foods to kids is paying off,” Brower observes.

A month after she began her campaign, “PepsiCo Inc., the world’s second-largest food and beverage company, pledged to stop selling full-sugar soft drinks in schools by 2012.” In addition, Kraft Foods Inc., the maker of Oreo cookies and Oscar Mayer lunch meats, jumped on board, announcing that it would further reduce the sodium content of its products..

Reporter Brower points out that the first lady’s efforts are part of a “movement to recast what the food industry is selling,” according to David Kessler, who was Food and Drug Administration commissioner from 1990 to 1997. “She puts the spotlight on the issue like few others can,” Kessler told Brower.

The American Beverage Association — which represents soda companies — has now joined Michelle Obama’s effort by running a national ad, which claims that the industry is committed to reducing beverage calories in schools by 88 percent.

Things started happening after a well-publicized meeting in Washington on March 16 when the first lady addressed members of the Grocery Manufacturers Association, which represents major food companies such as Kraft and PepsiCo. At that GMA meeting, Obama urged the companies to reduce sugar, fat and salt in their products and “to move faster and to go farther” to make them healthier.

The first lady has “accelerated our focus,” Kraft’s president of health and wellness, Rhonda Jordan, told the Bloomberg Business Week reporter Brower, who then quotes Patrick Basham, an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute, a Washington-based research group that promotes libertarian policies.

Basham believes that the first lady’s anti-obesity efforts are “in sync with public skepticism about `the motives of big business’ in the wake of the deepest economic crisis since the Great Depression.” He also believes that the recent moves by the companies may be an effort to prevent government crackdown.

“The food industry is terrified of being either legislated out of business or so regulated they won’t be able to do what they want,” Basham told Brower.

What’s intriguing is that Michelle Obama became concerned about child nutrition for personal reasons.

She told audiences at a National PTA Conference in Arlington, Virginia, on March 10, that she got a “wakeup call” when her pediatrician voiced concern about her family’s eating habits.

While I applaud the first lady’s efforts, as always, no matter what changes the large food companies institute, I encourage people to reduce or even eliminate their consumption of processed foods.

Vegetables and fruits that come courtesy of Mother Nature are best for our bodies. Plus, they taste better — something you’ll discover after you cut back on processed carbs.

We just don’t need to consume large quantities of packaged foods that usually have been extensively processed, with sugar, fat and salt added.

Children Are Likely Watching Junk Food Ads on Nickelodeon

Fat kid watching TV 6a00d834520ed269e20105361768fc970c-320wi Whenever children watch the popular children’s network Nickelodeon, nearly 80 percent of food ads they see are promoting foods of poor nutritional quality,
according to an analysis conducted by the Center for Science in the Public Interest.

This is only “a modest and not quite statistically significant drop
from 2005, when CSPI researchers found that about 90 percent of food
ads on Nick were for junk food,” CSPI announced.

The watchdog organization points out that between the two studies (in 2005 and 2009), the
food industry instituted a self-regulatory program through the Council
of Better Business Bureaus, the Children’s Food and Beverage
Advertising Initiative
(CFBAI).

Cookie crisp - gm ccok cisp Listen to what else CSPI discovered with advertising from food companies that
participate in the “self-regulatory program.”

Of 452 foods and
beverages that companies claim are acceptable to market to children, 267, or nearly 60 percent, do NOT meet CSPI’s recommended
nutrition standards for food marketing to children, such as General
Mills’ Cookie Crisp
and Reese’s Puffs cereals, Kellogg Apple Jacks and
Cocoa Krispies cereals, Kellogg Rice Krispies Treats, Campbell’s
Goldfish crackers and SpaghettiOs, Kraft Macaroni & Cheese, and
many Unilever Popsicles.

“While industry self-regulation is providing some useful
benchmarks, it’s clearly not shielding children from junk food
advertising, on Nick and elsewhere,” said CSPI nutrition policy
director Margo G. Wootan.

“It’s a modest start, but not sufficient to
address children’s poor eating habits and the sky-high rates of
childhood obesity.”

“Nickelodeon should be ashamed that it earns so much money from
carrying commercials that promote obesity, diabetes, and other health
problems in young children,” Wootan said. “If media and food companies
don’t do a better job exercising corporate responsibility when they
market foods to children, Congress and the FTC will need to step in to
protect kids’ health.”

Wootan makes some valid points. Nick should be embarrassed by the fact that so many TV ads pitch junk foods that can lead to obesity, diabetes and more.

It’s time, I believe, for the government to step in to prevent junk food advertising to kids.

Michelangelo’s David Returns to Italy After Touring the U.S.

This clever, fictional visual spoof — posted by a variety of bloggers such as the Director Blue Blog, the Democratic Underground and British reporter Daniel Hannan (The Telegraph) — aptly portrays the terribly tragic, ever-widening, health-harming effect that certain American food companies have on the waistlines of people living or visiting here.

This satiric photo essay is sad but also funny, isn’t it?

Now, read the brief commentary that goes with this satiric transformation.

“After a two-year loan to the Smithsonian Museum in the United States, Michelangelo’s David has returned to Italy.”

Where did David’s vava-voom appeal go? Well, just look at the fictional sponsors.

“The visit was generously funded by:


 

What a brilliant, but horribly depressing commentary on our epidemic of obesity.

What do you think of this clever commentary? Share your thoughts.

High Fructose Corn Syrup: Dig Deeper Before Believing the New Corn Lobby Ads & Consuming the Stuff

Have you seen any of the TV spots, print and online banner ads that seek to convince us that high fructose corn syrup is fun to consume?

Before you believe the many new ads from the Corn Refiners Association – which is spending a reported $20 million to $30 million to convince us of its safety — I urge you to get facts from my recent Gab With The Gurus Radio Show, where I had the following guests:

Before, during or after you listen to the Gab With the Gurus Radio Show about high fructose corn syrup, I recommend that you:

Remember, you can listen at any time to the Gab  With the Gurus Radio Show about high fructose corn syrup.

TV Ads Make Kids Fatter: Ban Those Junk Food Ads Targeted at Children

Fat boy fattv2404_468x312 Parents have been complaining about this for years, but now a study confirms that watching too much TV can make kids fat.

But, specifically, watching those food commercials for junk aimed at them that makes them wider. Not only that, but if there was a ban on fast food TV advertising, you'd see a big move to reverse childhood obesity trends, according to a new study from researchers from the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). 

In fact, just getting rid of those enticing TV spots for fast food could lead to 18 percent fewer overweight kids aged 3 to 11 and it would reduce the number of overweight adolescents ages 12 to 18 by 14 percent.

Of course, this study, published in this month in the Journal of Law and Economics, certainly adds to the ongoing debate in the food industry about whether or not child-directed food and beverage advertising should be allowed.

So why don't the government step in and do something about this? President-Elect Obama, are you listening?

Thanks to Food Navigator for tipping me off to this study.

Check out the Seattle Post Intelligencer story, too.